Project Evaluator

Type: Consultancy
Location: Remote
Application Deadline: 2021-12-15T22:09:27
Duration: April 15, 2024

Justice Education Society

The Justice Education Society of British Columbia (JES) is a non-profit organization with more than 30 years of experience providing public legal education and justice system capacity building in Canada and overseas. Our mission: We empower people to access and deliver justice in Canada and globally.

In Canada, JES helps more than 700,000 British Columbians learn about our justice system and address their legal issues. Internationally, JES has programs in Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Panama and Guyana, working with national institutions to strengthen justice systems, improve citizen security and increase access to justice. JES has offices in Canada, Guatemala, Honduras and Guyana and diverse sources of funding including donors and provincial, federal and overseas governments. More information on JES is available at: www.JusticeEducation.ca.

Related JES Programs 

INDIGENOUS PROGRAM: Outreach program provides education on BC's laws and justice system to Indigenous Peoples throughout BC. Topics include Restorative Justice, Truth and Reconciliation, Contact with Police, Crime & Sentencing (Gladue), and more. 

COMMUNITIES AGAINST SEXUALLY EXPLOITED YOUTH: Prince George based program provides education to youth and youth workers, empowering people to understand risks, identify warning signs, report incidents, community supports and exit strategies related to sexual exploitation of youth.

HT Project Partnership 

JES is partnering with Atira Women's Resource Society (Atira). Atira is a Vancouver-based non-profit committed to ending violence against women. Many of Atira's clients are Indigenous Women sex workers. 

HOUSING: Atira provides low barrier housing for over 1500 women and children in the Lower Mainland. Facilities include 

  • Imouto: long term transition housing for women ages 13-29; 
  • Sereenas House and Secord: support women to live independently of violence, abuse, and substance use; 
  • Miyotehew: a dedicated floor at Anjok in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside for Indigenous women. 

STOPPING THE VIOLENCE: Provides individual/group counselling to women and transwomen who have experienced current or past relationship abuse, sexual assault, or physical, emotional or sexual abuse at any age. 

WAABAN OUTREACH: Support services in Surrey for Indigenous women. 

PEACE: Breaks the generational impact of violence; supports youth exposed to abuse and helps them understand the dynamics of violence against women in relationships. Service available to youth and their mothers.

Background Information

Human trafficking is defined as the “recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation. (1) 

This project focuses on sexual exploitation based human trafficking, as compared to labor-based or other forms of human trafficking. Also known as sex slavery, trafficking in persons is a serious crime and a grave violation of human rights. It is also a complex crime that capitalizes on the vulnerabilities of marginalized people, may involve criminal organizations, and increasingly uses the internet to lure and exploit victims. 

Bias and socio-cultural norms and values held towards women, girls and LGTBQ2S+ populations, especially Indigenous Peoples, require individuals and institutions to be educated/sensitized on the vulnerability of these groups to sexual exploitation and human trafficking, to identify indicators of increased risk and to provide supports that empower girls and women to make more informed, healthier life choices and as possible, to escape sexual exploitation.

Although significant legal and political efforts have been made to address gender inequality, discrimination and sexual and gender-based violence in justice and law enforcement institutions in Canada, human trafficking remains a priority issue. 

The Project

Through this 36-month project, JES will develop and implement promising prevention and intervention practices that will advance knowledge and enhance empowerment supports for at-risk populations and survivors of human trafficking in British Columbia, especially Indigenous girls and women. 

The Empowering At-Risk and Sexually Exploited Women in BC project will support prevention for at-risk women, especially Indigenous women, through education programming. Developed with insights from at-risk women and service providers, JES will produce and distribute educational print, video and online resources, and deliver a series of webinars/workshops to at-risk women, especially Indigenous girls and women, as well as service providers with at-risk clients. 

Prevention programming will focus on education service delivery and resources, through in-person and digital channels to provide survivors' stories and personal connections to help at-risk women, especially Indigenous girls and women, to make more informed decisions regarding relationships, personal safety and sexual exploitation. 

Intervention programming will be delivered to BC sex trade workers – women living the life – empowering women to make healthier life choices and escape sexual exploitation. Working in partnership with Atira's Women Resource Society, the project will deliver programming that recognizes the intersectionality and complexity of human trafficking, gender-based violence and gender equality, especially for Indigenous women. 

Developed with insights from victims and survivors of sexual exploitation, JES and Atira will implement street-informed solutions that meet women, especially Indigenous women, where they are - empowering them to participate more fully and effectively in the decisions that affect their lives.

Project Objectives 

The Empowering At-Risk and Sexually Exploited Women in BC project will develop, implement and evaluate prevention and intervention programs that will enhance empowerment supports for at-risk women and girls, as well as women, especially Indigenous women, survivors of human trafficking in British Columbia.

Project activities will be user-centred, engaging women, especially Indigenous women, across British Columbia. 

Objective 1: PREVENTION

Provide prevention education to women in BC, especially Indigenous women, to empower them to make more informed decisions regarding their relationships, personal safety and sexual exploitation. The project seeks to change women’s perceptions regarding actions that put them at risk of being trafficked. 

JES will conduct needs assessment information gathering sessions with at-risk and sexually exploited women, connecting with at least 25 organizations and gathering feedback from at least 200 women. 

JES will produce and distribute/publish educational resources - in print, video and online for at-risk women in BC, especially Indigenous women, reaching at least 10,000 British Columbians by the end of the project. 

JES will deliver educational programming through at least 50 organizations, engaging at least 50 at-risk women in a mentorship program and educating at least 200 at-risk women. 

Objective 2: INTERVENTION

Develop and deliver inclusive education and programming that recognizes the intersectionality and complexity of human trafficking, reaching BC women where they are and supporting them to escape sexual exploitation. 

JES, in partnership with Atira and project collaborators, will develop and deliver programming that reaches women in the life and empowers women leaving the life, especially Indigenous women, to participate more fully and effectively in the decisions that affect their lives. 

JES will conduct needs assessment information gathering sessions with women sex workers and human trafficking survivors, working with up to 5 organizations and reaching at least 50 women, especially Indigenous women. 

JES will produce and deliver intervention programming that responds to the needs expressed by women in the sex trade, especially Indigenous women, providing increased supports for them to discover and consider options beyond sexual exploitation. Intervention education and programming will reach at least 200 women, especially Indigenous women, by the end of the project.

Project Evaluation 

The Empowering At-Risk and Sexually Exploited Women in BC project requires evaluation throughout the project life cycle. JES will develop and implement Prevention programming to empower at-risk girls and women in BC, especially Indigenous females as well as develop and implement Intervention programming to empower sex trade workers in BC, especially Indigenous women. An external evaluator will conduct a process evaluation in years 1, 2 and 3 of the project to assess the project approach, development of Prevention and Intervention programming and the impact of Prevention and Intervention programming (year 3).

Evaluation Objectives 

The objectives of the evaluation consultancy are:

  1. To conduct a process evaluation of the JES HT Project throughout the life cycle of the project
  2. To assess whether project activities have been developed and implemented as intended (years 1 -3) and that they achieved project objectives to empower at-risk and sexually exploited females, especially Indigenous girls and women in BC (year 3)
  3. To provide recommendations to strengthen project activities related to the complex nature of reducing human trafficking and its impact on vulnerable populations, especially Indigenous girls and women in BC
  4. To provide recommendations to strengthen project activities related to the development and delivery of gender-responsive, victim-centred, trauma informed and culturally relevant approaches to combatting human trafficking

Evaluation Scope

Evaluation of the Empowering At-Risk and Sexually Exploited Women in BC project will determine whether project activities have been developed and implemented as intended (years 1 -3) and that they achieved project objectives to empower at-risk and sexually exploited females, especially Indigenous girls and women in BC (year 3).

Year 1: Evaluate the project approach and planned activities. Ensure that the project approach and activities are appropriate before the project moves into the Programming Development and Programming Implementation stages. Evaluate the needs assessment activities. OUTPUT: Year 1 Evaluation Report

Year 2: Evaluate the development of Prevention and Intervention programming. Determine whether stakeholder voices, gender-based analysis and intersectionality issues have been integrated into Prevention and Intervention content and activities. OUTPUT: Year 2 Evaluation Report

Year 3: Evaluate the implementation of Prevention and Intervention programming, as well as measure project impact with target audiences. Determine if Prevention and Intervention education and supports were relevant and meaningful to project participants. OUTPUT: Year 3 Evaluation Report and Evaluation Final Report

Through the project evaluation, JES, the project funder and project stakeholders will have a greater understanding of effective empowerment supports to reduce sexual exploitation and human trafficking in BC, especially for Indigenous girls and women.

Evaluation Questions 

The list of questions below provides a framework for the project evaluation. The questions are meant to be suggestive of questions that the external evaluator may consider and integrate into their process evaluation of the HT Project. Other questions may be necessary and these would be finalized through discussions between JES and the evaluator.

  1. What is the primary purpose of the project? 
  2. How does the project intend to accomplish project objectives? (project approach)
  3. Does the project approach integrate gender-based analysis?
  4.  Does the project approach reflect the intersectionality of issues related to reducing sexual exploitation and human trafficking?
  5. Does the project approach respond to community needs?
  6. Who is the target population? 
  7. To what extent will the target population participate in the development of Prevention and Intervention programming?
  8. To what extent will service providers participate in the development of Prevention and Intervention programming?
  9. How will the needs assessment be conducted?
  10. Does the needs assessment include inputs from relevant stakeholders?
  11. What policies/procedures will be implemented to reduce risks and empower girls and women, especially Indigenous females?
  12. Does the project framework - Needs Assessment, Programming Development, Implementation - include relevant activities?
  13. How will the project approach respond to needs discovered during the needs assessment?
  14. What evidence-based measures are in place to measure project participation and impact?
  15. How will the implementation be developed and coordinated?
  16. What is the frequency of Prevention and Intervention programming? 
  17. How will target population be invited/registered/retained?
  18. Are project activities engaging key target audiences for Prevention and Intervention?
  19. Who will organize and implement the program? 
  20. Who will track program data and report to stakeholders/donors? 
  21. What evaluation methods will be used?
  22. What specific evaluation activities will be conducted to measure project success?
  23. How will the organization share project impact with the greater community?
  24. What resources are critical for the short-term and long-term success of the project?
  25. How will project initiatives be sustained beyond the project?

Qualifications

The selected consultant must have at minimum the following knowledge, skills and experience:

  • Experience conducting program/project evaluations for the justice and/or education sectors
  • Knowledge of best practices related to sexual exploitation and human trafficking, including the intersectionality of issue faced by vulnerable people, especially Indigenous girls and women in BC 
  • Have access to gender expertise to review Prevention and Intervention programming services and resources to make suggestions to improve project activities from a gender-responsive perspective 
  • Have access to Indigenous cultural expertise to review Prevention and Intervention programming services and resources to make suggestions to improve project activities from an Indigenous-informed perspective 
  • Ability to work in BC, with limited BC-based travel 

Terms of Payment

JES has a maximum of $25,000 (including GST) available to support evaluation of this project. Payment shall be made upon submission of the following deliverables during the project life cycle:

Deliverable

Target Date

Payment 

1

Year 1 Evaluation Report
Examination of the project approach and needs assessment activities 

April 15, 2022

25%

2

Year 2 Evaluation Report

Examination of Prevention and Intervention development activities

April 15, 2023

25%

3

Year 3 Evaluation Report

Examination of Prevention and Intervention implementation activities

April 15, 2024

25%

4

Project Evaluation Final Report

Examination of Prevention and Intervention activities for the full project

April 15, 2024

25%

All payments are subject to review and acceptance by JES.

Application

Applicants must submit a letter of interest together with an evaluation consultancy proposal outlining their expertise, approach and expected compensation. Applications should be sent to Dave.Nolette@JusticeEducation.ca, no later than December 15th, 2021.

 

1. United Nations Office on Drug and Crime (UNOCD). (2000). Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime. Definition, Article 3. Retrieved from https://www.unodc.org/res/human-trafficking/2021the-protocol-tip_html/TIP.pdf.